Copyright © 2014 The FOURnet Information Network. All rights reserved.

SUBSTITUTING HONEY FOR SUGAR 
Honey has been a favorite sweetener since prehistoric times and still has advantages over sugar even today.

Honey is composted of two simple sugars, glucose and fructose, honey is absorbed in a different manner and therefore causes a slower, more gradual rise in blood sugar. Because honey has a slightly higher percentage of fructose than sugar, it tastes sweeter, and less is required for equal sweetness.

Honey contains small amounts of numerous vitamins and minerals, but not enough to fulfill any of the body's daily needs. Remember that honey does contain calories, cannot be used freely by a diabetic and is not recommended for infant formulas.

The flavor, aroma and color of honey vary with the kind of flowers from which the bees gather the nectar used to make the honey. The fructose gives honey its sweet flavor, and the nectar adds the characteristic taste of the floral source to your recipes. The most common varieties in Texas are alfalfa, catsclaw, clove, cotton, horsemint, mesquite, orange, white brush, Chinese tallow, huajilo and wild flower.

Generally the lighter the honey, the milder the flavor. If a stronger flavor is desired for your recipe, use a darker, stronger flavored honey; if a more delicate flavor is desired, use a lighter, milder flavored honey.

Honey can easily be substituted for sugar as shown with the common recipe favorites included inside. Due to honey's ability to retain water, products made with honey tend to remain moister longer than similar products made with sugar or other sweeteners.

Some minor adjustments may need to be made to a recipe when substituting honey for sugar:

1. Use equal amounts of honey for sugar up to one cup. Over one cup, replace each cup of sugar with 2/3 to 3/4 cup over honey depending upon the sweetness desired.

2. Lower the baking temperature 25 degrees and watch your time carefully since products with honey brown faster.

3. In recipes using more than one cup honey for sugar, it may be necessary to reduce liquids by 1/4 cup per cup of honey.

4. In baked goods, add 1/4 teaspoon of baking soda per cup of honey if baking soda is not already included in the recipe. This will reduce the acidity of the honey, as well as increase the volume of your product.

Moisten a measuring spoon or cup first with water, oil, or an egg before measuring the honey to prevent it from sticking to the measuring utensil. Honey is heavy by weight. A 12 ounce jar equals one standard 8 ounce cup. A quart weighs 3 pounds.

Share: Add review or comment

  email this recipe to:  
 

Printer Options: Standard | Word Search Puzzle

Some of the recipes other cooks are looking at right now:

  top of page



COOKS.COM : COOKING, RECIPES AND MORE 0.57cb
COPYRIGHT © 2014 The FOURnet Information Network | Privacy | TalkFood
cpu: 0.02s