Using Leftover Fruit

WHAT TO DO WITH LEFTOVER FRUIT — From the COOKS.COM Culinary Archive.

WHAT TO DO WITH LEFT-OVER FRUIT

CONTENTS

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WHAT TO DO WITH LEFT-OVER FRUIT

  Ripe fruit is perishable, and when the supply is within control, the housekeeper should take care to keep it limited so there will not be large quantities on hand.  As soon as it shows signs of softening it is no longer fit to be served as fresh fruit, but should be cooked up at once with a little sugar added, and used as a sauce; or, with more sugar added and cooked longer, almost any fruit can be made into a good jam for future use.  Only perfectly sound, fresh fruit is safe to can.  Canned fruit when opened spoils more quickly than any other cooked fruit; it is therefore wise always to use any remainder as soon as possible.  It can be rubbed through a sieve, a little corn-starch added for thickening, made sweeter if necessary, and cooked until it thickens, and used as a sauce for puddings.  It can be molded in a corn-starch mixture, added to a muffin batter and baked, or stirred into ice-cream when the dasher is removed, or poured over ice-cream when it is served.  Many other ways will suggest themselves.

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FRUIT MACEDOINE

  It often happens that a little fresh fruit is allowed to spoil because there is not enough to go round again.  Instead of this two or more kinds may be mixed together very acceptably.  The following make good combinations: strawberries and pineapple; raspberries, currants, and a few pitted cherries; huckleberries and a few currants; peaches and pineapple; pears and peaches; orange, grape-fruit, and banana.  Keep the left-overs very cold and carefully, to avoid a "mussy" appearance, and serve again promptly.

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STEWED-FRUIT MACEDOINE

  A small portion of several fruits, particularly berries, may be stewed together, into an excellent sauce.  The following are good combinations: cranberries and a few raisins; rhubarb and huckleberries; raspberries and currants; huckleberries and currants.  Avoid long cooking of any of these, as it dissipates the flavor.

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APRICOT SAUCE

  Beat powdered sugar, apricot-juice, and pieces of fruit together.  Whip white of an egg very light, and add to beaten fruit and sugar, or add fruit gradually to unbeaten egg white, and beat some minutes.  Sauce made in second way will stand longer.  Different fruits may be used.

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APPLE-SAUCE CAKE

1 cup light brown sugar.
1/2 cup shortening.
1 cup apple sauce.
1 teaspoon salt.
1 teaspoon soda.
1 3/4 cups bread flour.
1/2 teaspoon each mace, clove, and cinnamon.

  Put sugar and shortening in mixing-bowl, add apple sauce, then dry ingredients already mixed and sifted.  Beat well, turn into deep pan, and bake in moderate oven about one hour.  If liked, one cup of floured raisins may be added with dry ingredients.  Butter alone may be used for shortening, or part chicken or rendered beef fat.

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APPLE CHARLOTTE

1 tablespoon gelatin.
1/4 cup sugar.
1/4 cup boiling water.
1 tablespoon lemon-juice.
3 tablespoons cold water.
1/2 cup strained apple sauce.
1 cup whipped cream.

  Soak gelatin in cold, dissolve in boiling, water.  Add sugar, lemon-juice, and apple sauce (more sugar if the apple sauce is not sweet), and set in cool place to stiffen.  When it is thoroughly chilled and begins to harden around the edges, beat with a whisk, adding gradually the whipped cream.  When stiff enough to drop, pour into mold and chill.  The whites of two eggs beaten stiff may be used instead of cream, and the charlotte served with soft custard.

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BLACKBERRY JELLY (WITH GELATIN)

2/3 cup blackberry-juice and pulp strained fro stewed blackberries.
1 tablespoon lemon-juice.
1/3 cup boiling water.
1/2 tablespoon gelatin.

  Soak gelatin in two tablespoons cold water; when softened dissolve in boiling water; add sugar if necessary, hot blackberry-pulp, and lemon-juice.  Mix, pour into bowl or mold, and set in cool place to form.  Serve with sugar and cream.

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BLUEBERRY ICE

1 pint stewed blueberries (already sweetened).
1/2 cup sugar.
1/3 cup lemon-juice.
1/3 tablespoon gelatin, soaked in half a cup of cold water.
1 cup boiling water.
1 beaten egg white.

  Strain berries.  (Juice should amount to one and one-half cups.)  Melt soaked gelatin in boiling water, add sugar, blueberry, and lemon-juice.  Cool and freeze.  Stir in beaten egg white just before freezing.

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STEWED CANTALOUPE

  When cantaloupes are cut they are sometimes found to be too green or too tasteless to be served as fresh fruit.  In such cases, cut the pulp out with a spoon or knife, add a little water, sugar according to the sweetness of the melons, and a few thin slices of lemon.  Stew until tender.

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CORN-STARCH PUDDING

1/2 quart milk.
4 tablespoons corn-starch, blended in little cold water.
1/4 cup sugar.
1 egg, well beaten.
1/4 teaspoon salt.
1/2 cup chopped cooked peaches, apricots, or pears.
Flavoring.

  Scald milk, stir in blended corn-starch, and cook five minutes in double boiler.  Place upper part of double boiler over heat, let corn-starch boil, return boiler to place, add sugar, egg, and salt beaten together, and cook two minutes, stirring constantly.  Flavor with vanilla, add fruit, and pour into mold.  Chill, and serve with sugar and cream.  An excellent way of using up small amounts of canned fruits.

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FRUIT COCKTAIL

  Mix one-third cup of pineapple shredded with a fork, one-half cup of sliced orange-pulp and bananas, one cup berries or grape-fruit.  Pour over a dressing made of one-third cup melted currant jelly, three tablespoons lemon-juice, and one half cup of sugar.  (Jelly and sugar are heated and lemon-juice added.)  Chill and serve in glasses.

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A CREAM FILLING FOR CAKE

  Take one cup of thick corn-starch custard, and mix it with one-half cup of chopped stewed prunes, drained very dry, and add a few chopped walnuts.

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EMERGENCY SALAD (FROM FRUIT AND NUTS)

  Cut a few bits of cheese into neat cubes.  Chop six or eight olives.  Break a few English walnuts into suitable-sized pieces.  Remove the skin and seeds from a bunch of white grapes, if at hand.  Slice a banana or orange.  Cut one or two small sweet pickles into thin slivers.  Mix all lightly together.  Take four fair red apples.  Polish them well, cut a thick slice from the stem end and take out the core and most of the apple part, so as to form a cup.  Mix the salad with a little mayonnaise, and serve in the apples, replacing the slice on top.

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FRUIT SOUFFLE

3/4 cup cooked and strained fruit-pulp peach, apricot, prune, or quince.
Whites 3 eggs.
Enough sugar to sweeten.

  Prepare pulp from canned or stewed fruit; add sugar if necessary; if too sweet, lemon-juice.  Beat whites of eggs stiff, add gradually fruit-pulp, and beat until all has been put in.  Turn into buttered molds, having them three-fourths full.  Place in pan of hot water and bake in slow oven until firm.  Serve with soft custard.

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SOFT CUSTARD

  Scald milk with lemon-rind, beat yolks, sugar, and salt together.  Combine by pouring hot milk gradually on yolks and sugar, stirring meanwhile.  Strain mixture into double-boiler and cook until thickened slightly.  Remove at once from double boiler and cool.  If vanilla is preferred, add when custard is cold.

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JELLY WHIP

3 tablespoons any tart jelly.
3 egg whites.
1/2 teaspoon lemon-juice.
1 teaspoon gelatin.
4 tablespoons rolled macaroons.
A little salt.

  Soak the gelatin in one tablespoon of cold water ten minutes, and then melt over hot water.  Add the jelly and salt to the unbeaten whites and beat stiff with a whisk, adding the lemon-juice and gelatin gradually.  Fold in two tablespoons of the macaroons and set away to chill.  Put a tablespoon of any juice fresh or canned fruit in small glasses, pile the whip lightly on top, and sprinkle with the remainder of the macaroons.

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GRAPE-FRUIT SERVED IN SLICES

  One large grape-fruit can be made to serve four people at luncheon by cutting it into thick slices like a watermelon, removing the fibrous core in the center and filling the space with any fresh fruit at hand, such as strawberries, peaches, or shredded pineapple.  Have all well chilled before serving.

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HUCKLEBERRY DUMPLINGS

1 1/2 cups left-over huckleberries.
4 tablespoons sugar.
1 teaspoon vinegar.
1 teaspoon cinnamon.
3 tablespoons water.

  Put above ingredients into saucepan and let them come just to the boil.  While these are heating sift together one cup of flour, two teaspoons of baking-powder, and one-eighth teaspoon of salt.  Beat up one egg, add to it about two tablespoons of milk, and stir lightly into the dry materials.  There should be just liquid enough to wet the flour, and make a very stiff dough.  Drop by spoonfuls into the boiling huckleberries, cover tightly, and boil ten minutes without removing the cover.  Serve at once.  A mixture of huckleberries and currants may be used, and the vinegar omitted.

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HASTY HUCKLEBERRY PUDDING

  Take four slices of cut bread that has not become dry.  Butter the slices on both sides.  Place one each in individual sauce-dishes.  Grate a very little nutmeg on the top of each, and pour over enough warm, stewed huckleberries to moisten and well cover.

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LEMON CUPS FOR DRESSINGS

  When making lemonade save the best skins by putting them at once in cold water.  In this way they will keep for several days, and are nice to use in serving salad dressings with lettuce salad, or cocktail sauce with oysters or clams, or cold Hollandaise sauce with fish.

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LEMON SYRUP FOR LEMONADE

  Do not allow an accumulated supply of lemons to dry up or mold.  They can be made into syrup which will keep for some time, and which can be used for lemonade by simply adding water.  To make syrup, boil a cup of sugar with one-quarter cup of water until it threads.  Add to this the juice and pulp of six lemons and the grated rind of two, being careful to grate only the thin yellow part.  Let all scald together, but do not boil.  Strain and bottle.

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PEACH TAPIOCA

  Soak one-half cup of granulated tapioca in one and one-half cups of cold water over night.  In the morning add two cups of boiling water and a little salt, and let it boil five minutes.  Then put into a double boiler and cook until clear.  Take the remnants of a can of peaches — there should be at least a cup, and if there is a pit or two all the better.  Add a little more sugar, and simmer until the syrup is somewhat thickened, and stir into the cleared tapioca.  Remove from the fire, cool, and pour into a glass dish.  Serve with sweetened cream.

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PEACH SAUCE

  When preserving peaches take the broken pieces and halves not perfect enough for putting in jars and make a sauce of them.  Add vinegar, cove, cinnamon, and sugar, and boil all together until of the right consistency.

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PEACH PUDDING

1 cup flour.
1/2 cup sugar.
1/2 cup milk.
Left-over peaches, canned or fresh.
2 tablespoons butter.
2 teaspoons baking-powder.
1 egg.

  Cream butter and sugar, add well-beaten egg, milk and flour and baking-powder sifted together.  Put a layer of peaches in a buttered baking-dish, pour the batter over, and bake.  Serve with cream and sugar, or sweet sauce.  Over fruits may be used instead of peaches.

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SAUCE OF MIXED FRUIT

  One or two kinds of stewed fruits added to a tart stewed plum sauce will improve it and give variety.  Rub the sauce through a strainer, add to it two or three Bartlett pears (cut fine and stewed until tender in a very little water), and a few tablespoons of left-over apple sauce.  Sweeten and cook together until the flavors of the fruits are well blended and the sauce has thickened slightly.

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FRUIT SAGO (FROM SYRUP LEFT FROM CANNING)

  In canning berries there is often a quantity of fruit syrup left over.  Take a 1/2 quart of any kind at hand, but raspberry or raspberry and currant particularly recommended, and stir into it when boiling three tablespoons of sago that has been soaked in cold water several hours.  Add more sugar if necessary and a little salt, and cook in a double boiler until the sago is soft.  Pour in a mold and chill.  This can be served with a little fresh fruit or with sweetened cream.

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FRUIT WHIP

  Put a little jelly or preserve in the bottom of lemonade glasses.  Fill up with sweetened and flavored whipped cream.  May be served as an evening dessert with light cakes.

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INDIVIDUAL SHORTCAKES WITH STEWED FRUIT

  Measure a pint of sifted flour.  Sift with it two tablespoons sugar, half a teaspoon salt, and four scant teaspoons baking-powder.  Cut into the mixture one-fourth cup shortening (equal parts butter and chicken fat or beef dripping may be used.)  Make a soft dough with about three-fourths of a cup of milk.  Bake in small tins, split after baking, butter the halves and spread between and on top any left-over stewed or canned fruits such as peaches, apricots, blackberries, or currants.  Small amounts may be used, varying the filling if there is not enough of one kind to go around, or a meringue may be made, for the top, of the beaten whites of two eggs sweetened with three tablespoons powdered sugar and flavored with lemon-juice.

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ORANGE PEEL

  Do not make a practice of throwing away the skins of oranges.  The grated yellow rind makes a good flavoring for cakes, candies, pudding sauces, and icings, and is much cheaper than extracts.

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CANDIED ORANGE PEEL

  Cut the peel of three or four oranges into narrow strips and soak it twenty-four hours in enough cold water to cover, adding two tablespoons of salt to each quart of water used.  Pour off the salt water and rinse very thoroughly.  Cover with fresh cold water and boil until almost tender.  Make a syrup of two cups of sugar and one and one-quarter cups of water.  When it boils add the orange peel and simmer gently until it looks clear and the syrup has thickened.  Take out a few pieces at a time with a fork, roll in granulated sugar, and spread on a flat platter.  Or it may be dried in the oven with the door open, packed in glass jars, and used for mince pies, puddings, etc., cut in small bits.  If any syrup remains it can be used a second time, or it will flavor a pudding sauce.

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ORANGE BASKETS

  When the pulp of oranges is to be served in small pieces, or the juice alone used, cut the peel in the form of baskets with a handle half an inch wide, and with a spoon carefully remove the pulp.  Put the baskets at once into cold water and they will keep fresh for several days.  Use them for serving orange sponge, lemon jelly, or a fruit blanc mange.  An orange sponge may be attractively served to an invalid in this way.  For the sponge take the juice of a medium-sized orange, strain it, add two teaspoons of sugar, and stir until dissolved.  Add two teaspoons of cold water to one teaspoon of granulated gelatin.  When softened melt over hot water and add to the orange-juice with a few drops of lemon-juice.  Set on ice bowl until it begins to harden around the edge of the bowl, then beat with a whisk until the mass is thick and spongy.  Chill again and pile lightly in the orange basket after it has been well dried.

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RUSSIAN TEA

  Add a slice of lemon and a little preserve — strawberry, raspberry, etc., to tea, served hot in glasses.

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WATERMELON BALLS

  Any watermelon left over can be attractively served as a breakfast fruit by cutting it into perfectly round balls with a vegetable or ice-cream scoop, or if this is not at hand, cut the pulp out with a dessert-spoon into oval-shaped pieces, chill, and serve very cold.

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